Originally Posted By nationalpost

nationalpost:

Merging Canada’s provinces: From Pacific Columbia to East SaskitobaLast week a group of Senators asked Atlantic Canadians to “think big” and consider a Maritime Union. Well, the Post’s Steve Murray thought even bigger.

nationalpost:

Merging Canada’s provinces: From Pacific Columbia to East Saskitoba
Last week a group of Senators asked Atlantic Canadians to “think big” and consider a Maritime Union. Well, the Post’s Steve Murray thought even bigger.

(via pritheworld)

Tunisia’s Economic Woes: Memories of the Arab Spring

“Remember, we made revolution for work, dignity, and freedom. Now we can talk freely – but as for dignity, there are still no jobs.” For men such as Abderrahman El Heni, Tunisia’s post-Arab spring has not fulfilled his expectations for a brighter future. As a result, El-Hani joined thousands of Tunisians in a march demanding a brighter economic future.

The economic figures for Tunisia are frightening, to say the least. Unemployment is currently at seventeen percent, GDP declined 1.8 percent this year, and the country has just accepted one billion dollars in loans from the World Bank and the African Development bank.  The money will be used for facilitating investment, improving government transparency, create financial regulation, and helping to educate youth as the country moves forward.

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Originally Posted By markcoatney

The author of the original Vogue Assad piece, Joan Juliet Buck, admitted, “she regretted the “Rose in the Desert” headline that Vogue put on the article,” but that “Mrs. Assad was ‘extremely thin and very well-dressed, and therefore qualified to be in Vogue.”

Originally Posted By wnyc

wnyc:

The Red Cross has been providing relief since the Civil War, but recently it’s run into an image problem.
The group was criticized for not being on the ground in New York City immediately following Hurricane Sandy when residents from Staten Island to Breezy Point were asking themselves: where is the familiar red-and-white logo of the Red Cross?

wnyc:

The Red Cross has been providing relief since the Civil War, but recently it’s run into an image problem.

The group was criticized for not being on the ground in New York City immediately following Hurricane Sandy when residents from Staten Island to Breezy Point were asking themselves: where is the familiar red-and-white logo of the Red Cross?

Originally Posted By pritheworld

pritheworld:

Cancer’s New Battleground Part 2: Pink Ribbons to Haiti

Haitian women know little about breast cancer, and those who contract it rarely receive treatment. An American charity and its local partners are trying to change that, but it’s not easy providing cancer care in the Western Hemisphere’s poorest country.

Originally Posted By kateoplis

kateoplis:

35-mile tribute to victims of Sandy, Global Rainbow, After the Storm by Yvette Mattern [photos]

Originally Posted By motherjones

motherjones:

According to an exhaustive review by Prof. James Lawrence Powell, only 0.17 percent of thousands of peer-reviewed papers question global warming or whether rising emissions are the cause. Yup.

motherjones:

According to an exhaustive review by Prof. James Lawrence Powell, only 0.17 percent of thousands of peer-reviewed papers question global warming or whether rising emissions are the cause. Yup.

Originally Posted By urbanplannerholic

urbanrelationsinfo:

Syrian internet restored, rebels say satellites kept them connected

Following a 48-hour internet blackout in Syria, rebels have released pictures of equipment that, they claim, kept them online throughout the cut.
Internet and phone services were restored in most areas of the country on Saturday after a two-day blackout and some of the worst fighting in Damascus for months. 
According to online experts, the cut was likely caused by government forces and many saw the regime agression in the capital, combined with the internet blackout, as no coincidence. 
In the past, the Syrian government has cut phone lines in areas where they are planning military operations. However, the latest blackout was the first to cover the whole country since March last year.
Rebels released images on Sunday of satellite equipment in an unnamed office that apparently kept them online during the shutdown. The pictures were apparently taken months ago but only released today.
Meanwhile, AP reported that 20 Lebanese volunteers, fighting alongside Syrian rebels, were killed by regime security forces. The news gave rise to fears that the Syrian conflict is spilling into the rest of the Levant region.

urbanrelationsinfo:

Syrian internet restored, rebels say satellites kept them connected

Following a 48-hour internet blackout in Syria, rebels have released pictures of equipment that, they claim, kept them online throughout the cut.

Internet and phone services were restored in most areas of the country on Saturday after a two-day blackout and some of the worst fighting in Damascus for months. 

According to online experts, the cut was likely caused by government forces and many saw the regime agression in the capital, combined with the internet blackout, as no coincidence. 

In the past, the Syrian government has cut phone lines in areas where they are planning military operations. However, the latest blackout was the first to cover the whole country since March last year.

Rebels released images on Sunday of satellite equipment in an unnamed office that apparently kept them online during the shutdown. The pictures were apparently taken months ago but only released today.

Meanwhile, AP reported that 20 Lebanese volunteers, fighting alongside Syrian rebels, were killed by regime security forces. The news gave rise to fears that the Syrian conflict is spilling into the rest of the Levant region.

(via urbanplannerholic)

Phases of the Moon: Considering the Possibility of China’s Rise

At a book signing at Princeton University on November 19, 2012, noted economist and former IMF research chief Arvind Subramanian [no relation] discussed some of the ideas presented in his new book Eclipse: Living In The Shadow of China’s Economic Dominance, in which Subramanian lays out his prediction that China will become the world’s preeminent superpower within the next twenty to thirty years. This prediction hinges on the sheer size of China’s economy and financial reserves as well as the author’s calculations that China will not reach its “ceiling of growth” for some time to come. Subramanian’s model takes into account the possibility that China’s growth will slow considerably as well as the assumption that American economic growth may rebound to pre-recession levels.

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Originally Posted By shortformblog

This administration — like previous administrations — has been very clear with Israel that these activities set back the cause of a negotiated peace.

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton • Discussing Israel’s plan to build new settlements on the West Bank in violation of international law, a decision announced hours after the United Nations voted in favor of giving Palestine de facto statehood. While critical of the newly-announced settlements, Clinton said that the United States would continue to favor Israel in peace talks. “If and when the parties are ready to enter into direct negotiations to solve the conflict, President (Barack) Obama will be a full partner to them,” she said. (via shortformblog)

(via shortformblog)

Originally Posted By statedept

In South Africa, Apartheid-Era Education Persists

It has been twenty-two years since former Prime Minister F.W. de Klerk and soon-to-be-elected President Nelson Mandela jubilantly held their intertwined hands above their heads, marking the end of apartheid and the beginning of a new South Africa: a rainbow nation that would count each of its citizens as equals. But has this dream actually been realized? Driving through the slums of Soweto earlier this year, my mother quizzed my tour guide on race relations since the end of apartheid in 1994. “Things are getting better,” he said, “but some things aren’t much different.”

Last Thursday, Jonathan Jansen, prominent South African academic and vice-chancellor of the University of the Free State, spoke out against the current status of education, especially for blacks in his country. He likened many present-day schools to those that existed under the Bantu Education Act , the law that created racially segregated schools for South Africans that would teach them how to succeed in the world in which they lived—for blacks, a world in which they were second class citizens.

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UN pushes for stronger efforts to end practice of female genital mutilation (by UNECOSOC)

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